Exploring early childhood teachers’ beliefs and practices in emergent literacy: Does practice vary by the socioeconomic status of the children?

NZ Int Research ECE journalFull reference
Dampney, A., Newbury, J., & McAuliffe, M. (2018). Exploring early childhood teachers’ beliefs and practices in emergent literacy: Does practice vary by the socioeconomic status of the children? NZ International Research in Early Childhood Education Journal, 21(2), 1-18. 

 

Original Research Paper

Exploring early childhood teachers’ beliefs and practices in emergent literacy: Does practice vary by the socioeconomic status of the children?

Amber Dampney, Jayne Newbury and Megan McAuliffe
University of Canterbury NZ

Abstract

There is limited research on the practices that New Zealand early childhood teachers (ECTs) use to facilitate the development of emergent literacy skills. The present study aimed to investigate the practices of ECTs in encouraging emergent literacy. Specifically the study investigated if these practices varied across different socioeconomic levels (SES) and whether there was a statistically significantly relationship between these practices and ECTs’ beliefs about literacy. Eighty seven ECTs from across New Zealand completed a survey about their literacy beliefs and practices. The results indicate that ECTs engage in a range of literacy practices moderately frequently, and that there was no statistically significant relationship between practices used to promote literacy skills and the SES of the early childhood centre in which they were employed. However, there was a statistically significant relationship between the ECTs’ literacy practices and beliefs regarding their role or the role of the centre in promoting literacy. In contrast, the relationship between ECTs’ emergent literacy practices and beliefs about current research was not significant. The present study provides insight into the practices used by ECTs to promote emergent literacy development, and the influence their beliefs have on these practices.  Implications for raising achievement in literacy are discussed.

Key words: Emergent literacy, early childhood teachers, beliefs, practices.

READ MORE



Oops ... you are attempting to view an article or a resource in the member-only area.  

To keep reading, you need to login with your membership login Smile

If this is not one of our 'Educators' or 'Service Provider' articles, then it is most likely a NZ-Int Research in ECE Journal article that can be accessed through a library subscription or a research membership if you are not an educator or service provider.  

Not a member?  Look below ↓ for the click here button ↓   It will take you to the membership page to sign up and choose your own unique username and password.

Are you interested in joining us? 
Become a member and also gain access to our significant online knowledge base 

Membership Options

Educator
Membership

Who is this for?
Teachers - Student Teachers - Parents
$78.00 one year
$145.00 two years
Your own personal username and password.
Includes access to research library

ECE Service Provider  
Membership

Who is this for?
Service providers with one or more licensed ECE services
Starting from $198.00 for one year
Your own unique username and password.
Includes access to research library 

Researcher Membership or
a Library Subscription

Who is this for?
Libraries and organisations $250 annual 
Researchers $145.00 for two years
Access to over 20 years of NZ-International Research in ECE journal issues and articles